Birds

Birds living in Ventura County's coastal region

Cooper’s Hawk

The Cooper’s Hawk is a medium sized raptor that frequents both oak woodland and grassland habitats. They primarily forage by stealthily hunting game such as small mammals and birds. They are known for being very fast and aerobatic fliers and will dive violently after prey. They can be spotted year round at the RVCT.

Red Tailed Hawk

Red tail hawks are large sized raptors, some up to a 52 inch wingspan and are the most common hawks seen at the RVCT. They have a shrill call that is very distinctive and is heard very commonly. Guests can observe them soaring in wide circles above all grassland ans sage scrub habitats looking for prey. They are opportunistic feeders and will after dive for prey in a slow and controlled manner.

Greater Roadrunner

Roadrunners are one of the most distinctive birds that can be found at the RVCT possessing long legs, large beaks a crested head and striped plumage. They are members of the cuckoo family and can reach sizes of up to two feet tall. As their name implies- this bird is a very fast runner and uses this speed to dart out from cover and pursue a wide variety of prey including small mammals, lizards, insects and snakes. They are spotted in areas that allow them to hide such as sage scrub, tall grass and Mulefat thickets.

Eurasian Collared Dove

Eurasian collared doves are commonly seen birds who have recently been naturalized in North America. They are members of the pigeon family and have plump bodies, small heads and long tails and a speck of black plumage on their necks. They can be spotted perching on fenceposts, telephone wires, large trees and foraging for seeds on the ground. These doves frequently vocalize with a distinctive three syllable coo.

Mourning Dove

Mourning doves are very abundant and are common sights at the RVCT. They are members of the pigeon and have plump bodies, small heads, short wings small beaks with tannish-grey plumage. They are known for being very fast flyers and frequently travel in formation in large flocks through the Trust. Mourning doves are voracious eaters and can eat up to 20% of their body weight in seed per day. They are often seen in grassland and sage scrub foraging or resting on fence posts and power lines. They can survive well in dry conditions due to their ability to drink and process brackish spring water.

Mourning Dove

Mourning doves are very abundant and are common sights at the RVCT. They are members of the pigeon and have plump bodies, small heads, short wings small beaks with tannish-grey plumage. They are known for being very fast flyers and frequently travel in formation in large flocks through the Trust. Mourning doves are voracious eaters and can eat up to 20% of their body weight in seed per day. They are often seen in grassland and sage scrub foraging or resting on fence posts and power lines. They can survive well in dry conditions due to their ability to drink and process brackish spring water.

Anna's Hummingbird

Anna’s Hummingbird

Anna’s hummingbirds are small aerobatic, very fast flying medium sized hummingbird (relative to humming birds) and are about the size of a ping pong ball. Their plumage is usually green and grey with males having a distinctive iridescent pink or fuchsia head. This species is known for its extravagant mating dance display with males flying to a height of 131 feet and diving back down in 12 seconds or less. Anna’s hummingbirds are observed zipping between various flowers feeing on plant nectar and/or chasing down small insects. Their habitat includes sage scrub, grassland riparian habitat and oak woodland.

California Quail

California Quail

California’s State Bird, the California Quail is a very common sight at the RVCT. This bird is roundish in shape with a pointed tail. This bird displays distinctive plumage with a grey colored breast, intricate scaled pattern on the underside white and black facial markings and a forward leaning plume it’s head made of six separate feathers. Females are a planer brown color and lack facial markings. Quail congregate in large groups and can be found foraging for seeds an insects in upland areas around sage scrub grassland and oak forest. When disturbed they will quickly fly into brush or cover where their camouflage helps them blend in almost seamlessly.